T E A C H I N G
Classical Chinese Philosophy
 
Classical Chinese Philosophy is an introduction to the major philosophers of the classical period in China (ca. 600—221 BCE). Topics include Kongzi (Confucius), Mozi, Yang Zhu, Mengzi  (Mencius), the Daodejing, Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and Han Feizi. The course also attends to issues in East-West comparative thought, as well as to the relevance of Classical Chinese Philosophy for the contemporary world.



Ethics and the Health Professions
 
Ethics and the Health Professions is a graduate-level seminar on the ethical dimensions of healthcare. The goal of the course is to provide students with opportunities to discern philosophical fundamentals in various healthcare contexts. Topics range from the professional-patient relationship to the political economy of healthcare on a global scale.



 
Ethics and the Media Professions is an introduction to the ethical issues raised by the entertainment media, including television, radio, film, graphics, and photography. The goal of the course is to provide students with the resources and background required to recognize, navigate, and constructively respond to the ethical challenges faced by entertainment media professionals. Toward that end, the course focuses on three interrelated topics:
 
  1. Ethical concepts and methods, including traditional views about ethical standards and how they should be determined.
  2. Specific areas where ethical issues arise in the entertainment media, including the portrayal of sex, violence, stereotypes, and the uses of digital technology.
  3. Questions concerning personal, professional, and institutional responsibility, and the ethical challenges of professional life.



Introduction to Moral Theory
 
Introduction to Moral Theory is an introduction to some of the central problems of moral philosophy. Topics include (1) the major moral theories, including Utilitarian, Kantian, Aristotelian, and Social Contract theories; (2) the relationship between morality and religion, self-interest, and a scientific worldview; and (3) a range of disputed moral issues, including our duties to non-human animals, the obligations of the affluent towards the poor, and the ethics of radical human enhancement. Readings are from both historical and contemporary sources.

Health Care Ethics and Advocacy

Health Care Ethics and Advocacy is a graduate-level course in the ethics and advocacy of occupational therapy. Informed by Jesuit social teaching, students learn to apply ethical decision-making strategies with a goal of creating a more just society. Students also learn to advocate for the profession of occupational therapy, for the clients of occupational therapy services, and for the community within systems that support or influence occupational participation.


Philosophy and Psychiatry
 
Philosophy and Psychiatry is a survey of the major problems and issues at the intersection of philosophy and psychiatry. Topics include the nature of mental health and mental illness; the dual nature of psychiatry as psychodynamic art and biomedical science; questions concerning difference, pathology, and psychiatric explanation; anti-psychiatry and the critique of traditional psychiatric practices; and contemporary normative issues in psychiatry as a value-laden science.



Philosophy and Religion
 
Philosophy and Religion is a survey of the major problems and issues at the intersection of philosophy and religion. Topics include the nature of religion; the problems of religious pluralism and diversity; questions concerning the nature of ultimate reality; arguments for and against the existence of God; faith and reason, science and religion; the philosophical challenges posed by religious experience; and the problem of evil and the human condition. Readings are from both contemporary and historical sources. Significant attention is paid to non-JudeoChristianIslamic perspectives and traditions.


Theories of Knowledge and Reality
 
Theories of Knowledge and Reality is an introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics include the (1) existence of God, (2) the relation of mind and body, (3) the limits of human knowledge, (4) the possibility of free will, and (5) the objectivity of moral values. Alternate theories are considered on each topic, with an emphasis on evaluating arguments in support of competing positions. Readings are from both historical and contemporary sources.